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20121212
20121212
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of course its friend, china is on the security council and has blocked those kind of actions in the past, jenna. jenna: interesting that you mentioned china. is there any indication that the north koreans had help from the outside? any sort of outside country with this launch? >> reporter: well there is no evidence per se but it is widely known that the north koreans could not get the parts for their ballistic missile program without having those parts flown through china, bypassed through china. there also have been reports on the voice of america that an iranian team of scientists have been seen recently, in recent days in north korea. so there is questions about the relationship between, and any help that may have been provided to the north koreans by the iranians. clearly the north koreans are very proud of this long range ballistic missile launch. the one in april failed miserably. and for the first time then they admitted that it did fail publicly. this time they extended the window and did not invite foreign journalists to watch this and simply announced when it was successful. th
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has b
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
turkey, you go to china, you go to india or you go to the united states, go up to the dakotas, you go to missouri, you go to joplin, what you find is that people are more resilient than we give them credit for being. people will will come out in their community and help themselves given the opportunity. now, again, back to the politics. being a heavily kurdish region, they don't have the greatest relationship with istanbul, they don't have the greatest relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relatio
of bermuda. >> reporter: they can take it to singapore or china. it doesn't to come back to america. there is no law which says if you make money overseas it must come back here. megyn: now they are getting upset overseas. the french tax authority removed computer files in italy. the tax police searched the come numbers milan offices. they say they don't believe they are paying their fair share of tax. that may or may not be true. but if it's legal how much can they do? >> reporter: it's perfectly legal. they investigated various companies and put pressure object them from a public relations standpoint. starbucks, for example, they weren't forced to hand over money but they were pressured into making a special payment of $10 million pounds, $16 million to the british chancellor of the exchequer. they did it for good p.r. maybe something similar will happen with google. they don't have to pay. they have done perfectly legal stuff. megyn: he reportedly turned down being treasury secretary, or the new secretary of business. he says it's called capitalism. we are proud to be capitalisti
is the economic power house already now and in the future. you have china militarizing in that region, north korea and so much commerce, money, and trade that everyone depends on now in asia. to have the militarization of the region by two such uncertain countries with uncertain tensions it is a chilling affect on the world economy. first the u.s., the national security concern about what north korea mooib might do. the deeper, broader, long-term concern about economics and trade in the region, but for them to achieve this kind of success with a long-range missile launch, that means combined with their nuclear program, by the way, of course means the concern now full tilt that they have the capability for an intercontinental ballistic missile launch, potentially in the future with a nuclear warhead and that could put hawaii, alaska and the west coast of the united states one day at risk. >> victor cha, when the government says at no time was the missile or the debris a threat to america. is it a matter of time before kim jong-un is a threat to america. >> it is only a matter of time and the time i
to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that it leads to higher wages, that it leads to marginally -- >> but what's wrong with giving people the freedom to
then? >> what are you going to do? you need another source of income. >> steve: call china! >> can we borrow more? you're already going to raise the medicare tax to help pay for obamacare. you're already raising the tax on some drugs to pay for it. what are you going to do now? if you don't get the medical device tax through, and you don't get the $29 billion, what are you going to do? you're right, steve. call china, let's borrow more. >> steve: so many people are fixated on the fiscal cliff and the president wants to jack up taxes on people who are successful. up to maybe about 40%. that's one of the theories out there. he'd love 40%. but a lot of people forget about the medical device tax, plus all the obamacare taxes already baked into the equation. >> it's a tax here, a tax there, a fee there, a fee here, everything goes up. medical care gets more expensive. not less expensive. >> steve: he talks about money. he talks about politics. he talks about all sorts of stuff on fox business, 9:20 eastern time. the great stuart varney, thanks for dropping by. >> thank you. >> steve: all r
is long but it starts in asia with the rise of china and india as economic, political and military powers. the obama administration has conspicuously announced a pivot to asia. at the center of this pivot is china, which exists as both an adversary to certain u.s. interests and a fellow traveler sharing mutual goals and vulnerabilities on others. the ongoing challenge will be for the united states to disce discern, sometimes issue by issue, whether china is an adversary or a partner. and this calibration will impact america's relations with the rest of asia and may ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in this world. while visiting indonesia, thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage to the circumstances with china. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursuit prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen
point of view was gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. with 100 inf missiles directed at them how has he going to do that? it was not in their interests to have 100 missiles out of europe and it was really in their interests. we now have access and have for some years to records of politburo discussions and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he rode out on the yellow pad several pages without prompting from anybody what he wanted to achieve at geneva in his first meeting. mcfarland handed this to me as we regretting it off of the plane to go to geneva saying this is what the president had on his mind. if he is wrong we will straighten him out. it was a very perceptive paper and among other things he pointed out that the biggest problems, one of these was lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we are not going to solve anything else. he also added, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev that we don't want an arms race. if he wants one he is going to lose it. an
he came from, back to china, but his home country, our good old buddies, the chinese, refused to take him back. they didn't want him, and so they stalled and stalled and stalled, and over those three years of chinese stalling and gave him the run-around, chen was eventually free and free to kill and kill he did. mr. speaker, this tragedy is not an isolated phenomena. flafflet, other americans have died as a result -- unfortunately, other americans have died as a result of a gaping hole in the immigration system. it's no secret that everybody believes our immigration system is broken. fixing it down the road will be complex and complicated, but there's some things we can do about immigration right now to fix specific problems and here's one of these. currently, mr. speaker, thousands of criminal aliens are in our country, just like chen, that have committed a crime, gone to prison, our immigration worked to order them deported but their country won't take them back. they refuse to do so, so those countries stall and delay and eventually never take back their outlaws. so by law when the
tougher sanctions on north korea but without support from china, options could be limited. this is video from overnight of the celebrations in north korea after the successful rocket launch. many countries believe it is north korea's way of testing its long-range ballistic missile technology. of course, the united states is very concerned about north korea's weapons capabilities this year. robert gates said north korea was within five years of being able to strike the continental united states. the white house condemns the missil launch calling it a highly provocative act that could impact stability in the region. alison burns, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> pope benedict really 16 is now part of the -- pope benedict is now part of the twitter nation. he already has more than 1 million followers who will read miss messages in english, arabic, polish and four other languages. >>> 8:16. pavi shankar has died at the age of 92. boy. he was good. he was known as the good father the world music. in fact -- known as the godfather of world music. in fact, the beatles gave him that name. he continued t
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)